William Sellers & CO.


William Sellers

William Sellers

At the great iron works of William Sellers & Company (Incorporated), Philadelphia, manual skill in a large measure is dispensed with as there arc various machines for turning, planing, shaping, drilling, or boring metal or wood in which the tool or cutting edge is guided in its fixed path by mechanical means.

Pennsylvania Avenue, Hamilton, 16th and 17th Streets

Pennsylvania Avenue, Hamilton, 16th and 17th Streets

In 1855, not two years after the occupation of the new works, Mr. Bancroft, the senior partner, died, and the business passed into the hands of William Sellers and John Sellers, Jr., the firm name being William Sellers & Company. The two brothers constituted the firm until 1873, when Coleman Sellers, John Sellers Bancroft and James C. Brooks, who had long been associated in the business were admitted to partnership. Their cast iron turn table hasĀ been adopted by many of the railroads in the United States, South America and Australia, and is in use in Europe. Among the most important of their recent productions arc two high speed power travelling cranes just placed in the new erecting shops of the Baldwin Locomotive Works. Each of these cranes has two 50 ton trolleys, making the total capacity of each crane 100 tons. This house introduced the Gifford boiler injectors into the United States, and improved it greatly, and is now sending the improved instruments in large quantities to the French railways.

The first display of the work of this house in Europe was in Paris in 1867. This they followed by a larger exhibit in Vienna in 1873. In Paris they received the Gold Medal, and in Vienna what is called the Great Diploma of Honor, the highest possible mark of appreciation. The award was to “Sellers for pre-eminent achievements in the invention and construction of ‘machine tools,’ many of which have been adopted as patterns by the constructors of tools in all countries.”